Acclimatizing in Manang for a much needed day of rest allows me to lay, basked in sunlight, listening to the wind blow through the cliff faces that surround this quiet little village in the Central Annapurna region of Nepal.

“I don’t know whether it’s the exposure to nature, the faint smell of burning pine, the soft chants of the locals, or simply the sounds of peace…”

My fingers tapping away, I’m listening to the chants of the locals doing their morning puja thinking… What am I feeling?

Sitting around 3500m above sea level, the air is thinner, as if to allow your brain more space to think.  The air, crisp and cool along my exposed skin, while the sun’s powerful rays warm my body, I’m feeling.  I don’t know whether it’s the exposure to nature, the faint smell of burning pine, the soft chants of the locals, or simply the sounds of peace that are making me feel this way, but with each day, and every step I’ve taken, my body and mind have opened a little more.

The Annapurna Circuit

At this point in my life I can safely say that this is one of the most physically and mentally challenging endeavors I have ever attempted.  Being a naturally social person, I’ve hiked for hours and hours with me, myself, and my thoughts.  Sure I’ve talked to myself, I’ve quite literally had to verbalize the commands for which foot to lift and when, and I’ve come to realize that I have found that which I wasn’t even looking for.  Ambiguous enough?  Well, despite my menial ability to use the English language, I cannot put into words what I feel, but it’s a feeling that I wish everyone feel at some point in their life.

Continuing 

With limited wifi, I will be gone for the next week and a half continuing the last half of the circuit, visiting the highest, largest lake in the world, visiting one of the most remote temples in all of Nepal and getting blessed by the 104 waterspouts of Muktinath.
More when I return.
Nirakar


Ps: If you want to know when and where I’ll be, check me at twitter! @ramblingwayfare

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